02/08

February 8, 2017

Talk of Prof. Pramod Khargonekar

--- Title: Renewable Energy, Electric Grid Integration, and Game Theory

Time
February 8, 2017

Prof. Pramod Khargonekar   
Vice Chancellor of Research
University of California,
Irvine, U.S.A.

 

Wednesday 2017-02-08 16:00
IST-Seminar-Room V9.22 - Pfaffenwaldring 9 - Campus Stuttgart-Vaihingen

 

Abstract

 

Wind and solar electricity production continues to increase in many parts of the world. Unlike traditional sources of electric energy such as coal, natural gas and nuclear, wind and solar electric generation is uncertain and (largely) uncontrollable. This creates fundamental systems and control challenges in their integration into the electric grid. In this talk, we will first describe the larger context of renewable electricity and grid control and management. We will then describe some of our recent results on certain aspects of this problem. Specifically, we will show how coalitional game theory can be used to understand and leverage benefits of aggregation among a number of energy producers. In a different direction, we will describe some results on the loss of efficiency (so-called price of anarchy) that results from distributed coordination and control of flexible loads as compared to optimal centralized control. We will conclude the talk with future research challenges.

 

   

  

Biographical Information

 

Pramod P. Khargonekar received BTech degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India and MS degree in mathematics and PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Florida, USA. He has served in faculty positions at the University of Minnesota, USA and The University of Michigan, USA. He was Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Michigan from 1997 to 2001, and also was Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science there. From 2001 to 2009, he was Dean of the College of Engineering and is currently Eckis Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. He served as Deputy Director for Technology at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E). From March 2013 till June 2016, he served as Assistant Director of the U.S. National Science Foundation as head of the Engineering Directorate. He joined the University of California, Irvine in July 2016 as Vice Chancellor for Research and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. His current research interests are focused on renewable energy and electric grid, neural engineering, and systems and control theory. He is a recipient of the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the American Automatic Control Council’s Donald Eckman Award, the Japan Society for Promotion of Science Fellowships, and a Distinguished Alumnus Award and Distinguished Service Award from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. He is a co-recipient of the IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Award, the IEEE CSS George S. Axelby Best Paper Award, and the AACC Hugo Schuck Best Paper Award. He was a Springer Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, USA in 2010. He is a Fellow of IEEE and IFAC. He has been on the list of Web of Science Highly Cited Researchers (2001).

  

 


 

 
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